1. Hey, Guest,

    Do you think you're halfway handy at making logo? If so, we want to hear from you. Please take a look at this thread to consider taking part in a design contest for our affiliated businesses.

    -The Directors

    Dismiss Notice

Historic The ask questions about history thread.

Discussion in 'History & Military Discussion' started by Arrou, Jan 11, 2015.

Tags:
  1. Morphic Tide

    Morphic Tide Crazy Brainstormer, Munchkin and Wannabe Min-Maxer

    Location:
    MI, USA
    I know that scribe numbers were focused, but I though the number of places scribes gathered was small enough that only Nobles could really afford to get libraries worth of books.
     
  2. Fernandel

    Fernandel Lovely Writing, Tendency to Waffle Councillor

    The Renaissance was also the age of tradesmen and bankers. They were often literally richer than kings.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  3. Morphic Tide

    Morphic Tide Crazy Brainstormer, Munchkin and Wannabe Min-Maxer

    Location:
    MI, USA
    Why do I keep not running into and forgetting these details? I though that the tradesmen and bankers richer than kings was a mid-to-late Renaissance thing.
     
  4. Fernandel

    Fernandel Lovely Writing, Tendency to Waffle Councillor

    Okay, serious question: when do you think the Early Modern Period started?

    Because "bankers richer than kings" started in the fifteenth century with the German Fugger banking family, which is generally thought to be still part of the Late Middle Ages.

    EDIT: Well, I say "generally", but you'll get different answers depending
    on who you ask when the Renaissance started. It's more of a fluid change than a clear caesura.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2016
  5. Morphic Tide

    Morphic Tide Crazy Brainstormer, Munchkin and Wannabe Min-Maxer

    Location:
    MI, USA
    ...1600s... I really don't know a lot of pre-1900 non-US history, I'm more of a science person.
     
  6. Fernandel

    Fernandel Lovely Writing, Tendency to Waffle Councillor

    Okay. First off: the Renaissance is perhaps not even considered a fixed time period, but more a collection of historical and social trends that happened to roughly coincide at around the same time period of history.

    There's different elements to determining the beginning of the Renaissance. Classically, scholars liked to link to the renewed interest of the ruling classes into antique Rome and Greece.

    However, there's a lot of arguments to be made that the "Renaissance" began a lot earlier. I've heard arguments that the rediscovery of old Roman legal texts that encouraged founding the first universities led to a greater interest in centralising states, kicking off the development of stronger central states that would later become nation states.

    Another aspect of the Renaissance was the increased proliferation of cheaper, more powerful gunpowder that allowed governments to keep their nobility in line by rendering the old system of castle fortifications irrelevant, resulting in more powerful central government. Also, more guns means you no longer need a warrior class like the knights as vassals to rally troops, allowing professional soldiers and mercenaries to flourish.

    Another aspect I've seen mentioned is the increased urbanisation of Europe and greater advances in rigging leading to greater trade, allowing commoners to amass wealth and thus political power. Wealth became its own independent political power, where before wealth was linked to holding land instead of conducting trade.

    And of course you have far more numerous and lasting religious schisms leading to conflicts between states that rally behind one religion or another, breaking the back of the Catholic Church as the unifying political entity of Europe and encouraging the rise of more politically independent states.

    These are all trends that took literal centuries, though. There's no clear date where the Middle Ages end and the Renaissance begins. In fact, some histories refuse to use the term "Renaissance" because they think it's misleading about a mythical "Rebirth" when it just continues previous trends, using the term "Early Modern Period" instead. Some even say it started at different times in different areas.
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2016
    • Like Like x 8
  7. As I understand libraries worth of books is actually development later even to printing press. Medieval epic poems and chronicles were not necessarily that large or gathered like that. The largest medieval poem produced here, Czech Alexandreis, is 18000 eight syllabic lines. Like, pretty solid, but not War and Peace.

    Further just (high) medieval Bohemian court is over 100 literate people at every moment.

    Also common scribes might not have necessarily been paid super well and might produce poorly made copies as part of their training. The gold plated and illuminated manuscripts, might not have been the standard even then.

    Apologies for unfocused post.
     
  8. Theres gold in them thar asteroids, come n get me
     
    • Like Like x 1
  9. Ever since the Commission on Unified Pronunciation of Chinese in 1912, all Chinese governments more left-wing than the Qing (yes, there were royalist warlords) have looked into character simplification. The Kuomintang government had actually tried to introduce simplified characters as part of a wider spelling reform planned to begin in 1936, but there was not enough official support during those chaotic times to make a dent. But really, both the KMT and CCCP simplification attempts were very similar. They looked at what shortcuts people were already using and made their favorite shortcuts part of the education system. While Chinese dynasties did use the writing system as a method of control, I don't think the surviving simplified characters follow the same system. Almost all of the simplifications that look significantly different from their traditional counterparts were part of the second wave of simplifications, and those were swept away after the cultural revolution ended.

    So I'd say it's more like every major player who hated the Qing in early 20th-century China wanted simplified characters, but only Mao had the power to do it.
     
    Last edited: Dec 2, 2016
    • Informative Informative x 6
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Curious to know more about this.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  11. galahad

    galahad Seeker of Truths

    Does Marcus Aurelius have the qualities of a Philosopher King as described by Plato ?
     
  12. How important was the Gold standard in contributing to the California Gold Rush?


    I read that reliance on metallics meant people were always interested in seeking mineral wealth , proving a powerful draw to colonisation efforts like above said gold rush
     
    Last edited: Dec 19, 2016
  13. Fernandel

    Fernandel Lovely Writing, Tendency to Waffle Councillor

    I don't have a lot of knowledge on this topic, but the fact that government decided that gold would always be exchangeable into hard currency must have influenced things in some way.

    But I'm not quite sure whether it inflated (hah!) the Gold Rush. IIRC, gold has always been sought after for thousands of years because it always had a value as the raw material from which luxury goods like jewellery, decorations, etcetera were produced.

    So yeah, no idea. Anyone more qualified than me know?
     
  14. Anyone knows the most intense, as in shells fired, big gun naval battle, big or small?

    I have been reading again articles about various skirmishes in WW2 and came across some pretty intense firefights like the Battle of the River Plate or the TAFFY battle. Any nominations?
     
  15. CV12Hornet

    CV12Hornet Riter.

    Location:
    Tacoma, Washington
    Jutland has to be up there. Between them the two fleets expended over 8000 battleship-caliber shells and about the same number of lighter shells over the course of a single day. For sheer effect, Tsushima's a good candidate. It must have been absolutely hellacious to be on the Russian ships, given all the large-caliber high-explosives the Japanese hit them with. And then for raw chaos, First Guadalcanal is practically unmatched in the big-gun era. How many other battles involving steel ships have such descriptors as "a barroom brawl with the lights shot out" and "ranges John Paul Jones would have deemed close"? Or a battleship and a destroyer trading machine-gun fire at ranges that risked scraping each other's sides?
     
    • Informative Informative x 6
    • Like Like x 1
  16. all fictions

    all fictions Painted Black

    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    Is it true the Ancient Greeks didn't conduct warfare in winter?
     
  17. Hykal94

    Hykal94 The Kitteh Knight of Islam

    Pretty sure that's a rule of thumb in the majority of human history?
     
    • Like Like x 2
    • Insightful Insightful x 1
  18. What were the results of the Crusades in general?
     
  19. Vyslanté

    Vyslanté Putting the "late" back in "translate"

    Deaths.
    Lot of deaths.
     
  20. Halcyon

    Halcyon Umaïar

    Location:
    US
    The crusades in Iberia successfully pushed the Muslims out.
     
  21. Hykal94

    Hykal94 The Kitteh Knight of Islam

    Which Crusades? The Holy Land died with a whimper when the Mamluks got their shit together, the Reconquista solidified Christian rule, and the Teutonics were able to convert the pagan peoples to Christianity at least until Poland and Lithunia joined forces and defeated them.
     
    • Informative Informative x 3
    • Like Like x 1
  22. Vyslanté

    Vyslanté Putting the "late" back in "translate"

    Oh, and the Albigensian Crusade managed to eliminate catharism (and bringing Toulouse closer to the French Crown)
     
  23. I meant to say the first Crusade.
     
  24. all fictions

    all fictions Painted Black

    Location:
    Montreal, Quebec
    Aren't winters less harsh in southern Europe? I wouldn't think it would be a problem.
    The creation and consolidation of the Crusader States (Jerusalem, Edessa, Antioch, etc.), with the barons dividing the territory of Palestine (or as they called it, Outremer ― the "Land Beyond the Sea" in French) among them. Also, much of Jerusalem was destroyed and most of its civilian inhabitants were killed or expelled.
     
  25. galahad

    galahad Seeker of Truths

    Depends on area, the Balkans which were important to the Hellenic world can get cold like southern Ontario. Many areas of Turkey which again fell into the Greek world sees temperatures below -10 C in winter and is rugged mountainous terrain. Not good for winter warfare.
     
    Last edited: Dec 22, 2016
    • Insightful Insightful x 3
    • Informative Informative x 1
Sufficient Velocity Internal Ad System Staff