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The War Room Reference Library

Discussion in 'History & Military Discussion' started by Cetashwayo, Apr 21, 2014.

  1. Cetashwayo

    Cetashwayo Lord of Ten Thousand Years Magistrate On Leave Commission Artist

    Location:
    Across the Horizon
    Hello everyone! You may remember me from such threads as the Mongol Conquests from another forum. I always wanted to do this on the other forum but didn't have time, so I might as well here. I want to start a reference library in the war room, where people can post useful sources to various history and military related topics for the benefit of everyone. If you want to recommend some, just post them in this thread and I'll add them to the original post.

    Online Sources

    Primary Sources
    Cavalry Outpost Duties by F.W. De Brack - First hand best practices for light cavalry as recommended by a French Cavalry officer who served in Napoleon's Grand Armee. It presents immense detail in clear, concise terms.
    A Brief Discourse by Humfrey Barwick - Transcribed for the use of the general internet by Norseman. A discussion by an Elizabethian officer in England regarding the value of firearms and the vaunted Longbow.
    Soviet Organization in WWII - Documents purportedly recovered from a fallen Soviet officer during the Winter War with a hyper detailed Table of Organization and Equipment, down to individual firearms, for Soviet armies circa 1942. I can't attest to their accuracy but I present this nonetheless.
    British Pathé newsreel archives, 1896-1976: Spanning the years from 1896 to 1976, the collection includes footage – not only from Britain, but from around the globe – of major events, famous faces, fashion trends, travel, sport and culture. The archive is particularly strong in its coverage of the First and Second World Wars.

    Aeronatical
    Flight- The British Aviation Magazine to be found online. It has its entire archive from 1999 to 2005 with lots of juicy information on planes to be found within.
    Airminded- Blog of aviation historian Brett Holman has collected links to online archives of a number of British newspapers here, and has annotated day-by-day British newspaper coverage of the 1909 and 1913 'scareship' waves, of the Sudeten Crisis of October 1938, and of the Blitz from 1940 to 1942.

    Modern Military

    "The Eagle Went Over the Mountain": powerpoint after-action report discussing clashes involving the US Marines in Helmand and Farah Provinces.

    Global War Games: Second Series 1984-1988. Robert H. Gile,

    Global War Games: The First Five Years. by Robert H. Gile,

    -- Both of these are reports on a series of wargames run by the USN in the 1980s. All of them deal with an American/NATO conflict with the Soviet Union, primarily in a conventional manner. The First Five Years one is smaller and less dense, while the Second Series is far more in depth. Both should be taken as American ideas of how a conflict would go rather than how said conflcit would actually transpire.

    Historical

    Iran Chamber Society- Essentially a massive collection of academic articles pertaining to Iran. People looking for rigorous research should beware in some instances, as it can sometimes be a bit biased against Muslim states and is very sparse on sources that aren't pre-Muslim. Still a great source, especially on the Sassanid and Achaemenid Empires.
    Livius- Essentially a gigantic library of terms about classical and ancient words, phrases, geographical locations, and basic history. Excellent place to learn about obscure names and so on.
    Encylopedia Iranica- What it says on the tin; an encyclopedia online about Iran. Since it isn't open source and not everyone can edit, it's actually a fairly rigorously researched collection of articles about Iran and related subjects. Excellent source.
    The Foriegn Military Studies Office - A treasure trove of first rate, in depth articles on a wide range of wars.
    Archive Awareness - A blog that translates a lot of historical documents with some comments, largely Soviet by volume though it features German, American, and British sources as well, from the timespan of WWII through to the Korean War.
    The Battle of Edge Hill - An interactive multimedia presentation covering the first serious clash between the Parlimentarians and Royalists in the English Civil War, which overlays a satellite map of the actual battleground itself.
    ATARN - The Asian Traditional Archery Research Network has a number of articles regarding the historic and modern traditions, or even reconstructions, of a culture of archery from Central to far Eastern Asia. Its contributors expound on everything from archeological recovery of ancient Saka bows to the reintroduction of archery in Mongolia.
    The Alderney Wreck - A website cataloging and discussing artefacts recovered from an Elizabethan shipwreck off the Island of Alderney, including a wide number of firearms, for which it presents a very good general overview of their use as military weapons.
    The Roman Army - An individual's own conclusions regarding the Roman Legions collated from scholarship I regard highly. One of the few general sites that will attempt to go into the "physics" of melee combat.
    Roman Emperors - Academic articles breaking down the individual reigns of Roman Emperors starting from Augustus to Constantine XI Palaeologus.
    De Re Militaria - "De Re Militari, begun in 1992, is the Society for the Study of Medieval Military History. Here we host many primary sources,articles, dissertations, and resources for the study of military actions, technology, and topics from the fall of Rome to early seventeenth century." An absolutely top flight resource that I recommend you look at immediately after consulting your university library.
    General Mongolian History - Some basic information on Mongolia.
    Historian on the Edge - A blog maintained by Professor Guy Halsall, a very insightful historian with a focus on the late Imperial Roman to early medieval eras, where he publishes early drafts of his academic essays and other materials.
    CLCV 205: Introduction to Ancient Greek History - Part of the Open Yale Courses library, Professor Donald Kagan's lectures for his course are published here both in video form as well as transcripts. It is difficult to find a better introduction to Hellenic thought and history than this lecture series.

    Cartographical

    Allsion Sermarini's Maps- Huge map resources from classical to medieval and beyond. Great detail and excellent maps.
    Ian Mladjov's Map Resources- Immense amount of detail put into maps from the 2200s BC to the 1500s. This is an academic site, not a random hobbyist, so it's very credible and has a lot of research put into it.
    Euratlas- Detailed maps of Europe from thousands of years ago to the present. Not always correct in some areas, it is nevrtheless a great resources, especially post about 1000 AD, and shows better the empty spaces between kingdoms that often existed.

    Demographic

    CIA World Factbook- A great, easily browsable, succinct source of official data on world populations and demographics.

    Geographic

    Flood Map Calculator- It's a calculator of flooding. Basically, you put in how high you wish the water to be, and it shows you which places will go underwater.
    While it's not precise, as it bases the calculations on the elevation factor alone, it's still an usefull tool.
    Earth Impact Effects- An easy-to-use, interactive web site for estimating the regional environmental consequences of an impact on Earth. This program will estimate the ejecta distribution, ground shaking, atmospheric blast wave, and thermal effects of an impact as well as the size of the crater produced.

    Scientific

    Center for Disease Control- While not exactly very militaristic, it has a lot of information on diseases and such. Including symptoms, spread maps, and precautions.

    That's all I got for now. You guys can post more in the thread so we can have a better appreciable understanding of war, history, and anything else, upping the quality of discussion. Check back on the original post for more sources added by me as I dig them up.
     
    Last edited: Apr 24, 2014
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  2. LordSquishy

    LordSquishy Probably Not A Producer

    Sadly all of my references are books...
     
    • Like Like x 1
  3. Cetashwayo

    Cetashwayo Lord of Ten Thousand Years Magistrate On Leave Commission Artist

    Location:
    Across the Horizon
    That actually gave me an idea, thanks Squishy. I added book recommendations, so if you only have hardcover sources you want to share, just give a brief description and encourage the expansion of our literary knowledge.
     
  4. anon_user

    anon_user anonymous user

    Location:
    maryland
    Flight archives, 1909 to 2005: Flight magazine is a British aviation magazine; it has put up its entire archives online as searchable pdfs.

    Airminded: The research blog of Australian aviation historian Brett Holman, whose focus is on the impact of military aviation on British society; he has collected links to online archives of a number of British newspapers here, and has annotated day-by-day British newspaper coverage of the 1909 and 1913 'scareship' waves, of the Sudeten Crisis of October 1938, and of the Blitz from 1940 to 1942.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
    • Like Like x 4
  5. 100thlurker

    100thlurker atheshtarih and Enemy of the Lie Magistrate

    Location:
    SMS Odette II
    Freely Available sources:
    Primary Sources
    Cavalry Outpost Duties by F.W. De Brack - First hand best practices for light cavalry as recommended by a French Cavalry officer who served in Napoleon's Grand Armee. It presents immense detail on all aspects of warfare directly to the reader in clear, concise terms.
    A Brief Discourse by Humfrey Barwick - Transcribed for the use of the general internet by Norseman. A discussion by an Elizabethian officer in England regarding the value of firearms and the vaunted Longbow.
    Soviet Organization in WWII - Documents purportedly recovered from a fallen Soviet officer during the Winter War with a hyper detailed Table of Organization and Equipment, down to individual firearms, for Soviet armies circa 1942. I can't attest to their accuracy but I present this nonetheless.

    Historical
    The Foriegn Military Studies Office - A treasure trove of first rate, in depth articles on a wide range of wars.
    Archive Awareness - A blog that translates a lot of historical documents with some comments, largely Soviet by volume though it features German, American, and British sources as well, from the timespan of WWII through to the Korean War.
    The Battle of Edge Hill - An interactive multimedia presentation covering the first serious clash between the Parliamentarians and Royalists in the English Civil War, from the most minor of anecdotes to archeological data, overlaying a satellite map of the actual battleground itself.
    ATARN - The Asian Traditional Archery Research Network has a number of articles regarding the historic and modern traditions, or even reconstructions, of a culture of archery from Central to far Eastern Asia. Its contributors expound on everything from archeological recovery of ancient Saka bows to the reintroduction of archery in Mongolia.
    The Alderney Wreck - A website cataloging and discussing artefacts recovered from an Elizabethan shipwreck off the Island of Alderney, including a wide number of firearms, for which it presents a very good general overview of their use as military weapons.
    The Roman Army - An individual's own conclusions regarding the Roman Legions collated from scholarship I regard highly. One of the few general sites that will attempt to go into the "physics" of melee combat.
    Roman Emperors - Academic articles breaking down the individual reigns of Roman Emperors starting from Augustus to Constantine XI Palaeologus.
    De Re Militaria - Also known as the Society for the Study of Medieval Military History, their website hosts many primary sources, articles, dissertations, and resources for the study of military actions, technology, and topics from the fall of Rome to early seventeenth century. An absolutely top flight resource that I recommend you look at immediately after consulting your university library.
    Historian on the Edge - A blog maintained by Professor Guy Halsall, a very insightful historian with a focus on the late Imperial Roman to early medieval eras, where he publishes early drafts of his academic essays and other materials.
    CLCV 205: Introduction to Ancient Greek History - Part of the Open Yale Courses library, Professor Donald Kagan's lectures for his course are published here both in video form as well as transcripts. It is difficult to find a better introduction to Hellenic thought and history than this lecture series.

    Current Affairs (?)
    Lawfare - A news blog with multiple contributors which not only focuses, as its name suggests, on the intersection between laws and warfare but also the world of cyberwarfare, autonomous weapons, etc. Very much a site to be aware of.

    (Edit: adding as I go along, I have a lot of bookmarks)
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
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  6. LordSquishy

    LordSquishy Probably Not A Producer

    Well excellent.

    Daily Life in Medieval Europe, by Jeffrey L. Singman. It has everything from architectural plans of houses to how to play medieval games to daily wages to the price of commodities (like cheese and ale), to agricultural yields and output. It's both fascinating and immensely useful.

    Life in a Medieval City by Joseph and Frances Gies. Much the same as above, but focused on city-specific life, including such things as the number of shoemakers per capita and whatnot, how to say medieval wedding vows...

    The Influence of Seapower Upon History, 1660-1783, by A.T. Mahan. The seminal work on Renaissance naval combat.

    Principles of Naval Weapons Systems, by Craig Payne. Recommended to me by @Apocal many years ago, still an unmatched basic resource on everything you need to know about modern naval combat systems.
     
    • Like Like x 3
  7. IofTheBunny

    IofTheBunny Bunny Bee

    https://www.cia.gov/library/publications/the-world-factbook/ - The official description says "The World Factbook provides information on the history, people, government, economy, geography, communications, transportation, military, and transnational issues for 267 world entities. Our Reference tab includes: maps of the major world regions, as well as Flags of the World, a Physical Map of the World, a Political Map of the World, a World Oceans map, and a Standard Time Zones of the World map." And it's exactly that, a great, easily browsable, succinct source of data.

    http://www.floodmap.net/ - It's a calculator of flooding. Basically, you put in how high you wish the water to be, and it shows you which places will go underwater.
    While it's not precise, as it bases the calculations on the elevation factor alone, it's still an usefull tool.

    http://impact.ese.ic.ac.uk/ImpactEffects/ - "Welcome to the Earth Impact Effects Program: an easy-to-use, interactive web site for estimating the regional environmental consequences of an impact on Earth. This program will estimate the ejecta distribution, ground shaking, atmospheric blast wave, and thermal effects of an impact as well as the size of the crater produced."

    Helpfull with calculating how big the boom will be when a rock falls. Will everyone die?


    http://wwwnc.cdc.gov/ - While not exactly very militaristic, it has a lot of information on diseases and such. Including symptoms, spread maps, and precautions.


    http://www.un.org/Depts/OHRM/salaries_allowances/allowances/danger.htm - A current list of countries with UN danger pay i.e. hotsposts.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
    • Like Like x 2
  8. anon_user

    anon_user anonymous user

    Location:
    maryland
    For book sources:
    The Bear Went Over the Mountain: Soviet Combat Tactics in Afghanistan, Lester Grau (ed.). Vignettes of small-unit actions (no more than battalion-size) from the Soviet-Afghan War of the 1980s, written by the Soviet field officers involved.

    The Other Side of the Mountain: Mujaheddin Tactics in the Soviet-Afghan War, Ali Ahmad Jalali and Lester Grau (eds.): companion volume to The Bear Went Over the Mountain, with vignettes of small-unit actions from the Mujaheddin perspective.
    ***
    "The Eagle Went Over the Mountain": powerpoint after-action report discussing clashes involving the US Marines in Helmand and Farah Provinces.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
    • Like Like x 1
  9. EricD

    EricD The Bee-Wolf

    If any of you are interested in European medieval military history (as I am), you will particularly like this site:

    De Re Militari: The Society for Medieval Military History

    It has a great deal of scholarly articles and book reviews on a vast array of medieval military topics, ranging from the medieval Roman military system to the Wars of the Roses and everything in between. It covers the Crusades and the Carolingian Empire, it covers tactics, strategy, logistics, military intelligence and all matters of interest to the medieval military historian. An excellent site in general.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  10. Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
    • Like Like x 1
  11. 100thlurker

    100thlurker atheshtarih and Enemy of the Lie Magistrate

    Location:
    SMS Odette II
    I beat you to it. :p
     
  12. 100thlurker

    100thlurker atheshtarih and Enemy of the Lie Magistrate

    Location:
    SMS Odette II
    [Reserved post for Books and paywalled sources]
     
  13. EricD

    EricD The Bee-Wolf

    ...DAMN IT LURKER.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  14. Cetashwayo

    Cetashwayo Lord of Ten Thousand Years Magistrate On Leave Commission Artist

    Location:
    Across the Horizon
    Guys, if you can, can you format your stuff like Lurker's? It makes it easier for me to just copy and paste it. So embed the link in the source title and include a description beside it, 1-2 lines.
     
  15. anon_user

    anon_user anonymous user

    Location:
    maryland
    British Pathé newsreel archives, 1896-1976: Spanning the years from 1896 to 1976, the collection includes footage – not only from Britain, but from around the globe – of major events, famous faces, fashion trends, travel, sport and culture. The archive is particularly strong in its coverage of the First and Second World Wars.
     
    Last edited: Apr 21, 2014
  16. Cetashwayo

    Cetashwayo Lord of Ten Thousand Years Magistrate On Leave Commission Artist

    Location:
    Across the Horizon
    Do you mind converting it to the

    Source with Link Embedded- Description

    format?
     
  17. neolives

    neolives Lt. CIC

    I've collected many in my years of study. Here some. They are almost all either academic monographs that can be accessed either as hard copies/eBooks through a local university/college library, or academic journals available in the same manner. I'll probably add some more later if I get the chance, I'm currently working on a paper on the CF so I'll probably have some sources on that later.

    I'm currently at the library but if you're prefer Cetashwayo when I get home I can reformat the titles.

    On American War Planning in the 1980s:
    Global War Games: Second Series 1984-1988. Robert H. Gile,

    Global War Games: The First Five Years. by Robert H. Gile,

    -- Both of these are reports on a series of wargames run by the USN in the 1980s. All of them deal with an American/NATO conflict with the Soviet Union, primarily in a conventional manner. The First Five Years one is smaller and less dense, while the Second Series is far more in depth. Both should be taken as American ideas of how a conflict would go rather than how said conflcit would actually transpire.

    Also I plan on doing a series of articles in a Lets Read fashion on these in the coming months so look for that.

    Russian Civil War/Russian Revolution:

    The White Army by Anton I. Denikin, - Denikin's memiors/recollections/thoughts on the Russian Civil War. Obscenely interesting and helpful for understanding the White Russian perspective and actions.

    The Republic of the Usakovka: Admiral Kolchak and the Allied Intervention in Siberia 1918-1920 by Richard Connaughton, London: Routledge, 1990. - An good book on Kolchak and the White Russians based out of Siberia. Style is a little weird but once you get going its quite interesting.

    The Volunteer Army and the Allied Intervention in South Russia 1917-1921: A Study in the Politics and Diplomacy of the Russian Civil War by George A. Brinkley, - It may be rather dated but it places the White Russians operating in South Russia in a international picture, also deals with Entente intervention forces.

    Civil War in South Russia, 1918 by Peter Kenez - Good overview of the opening Civil War in South Russia, given the title I never would have guessed.
    From Victoria to Vladivostok: Canada’s Siberian Expedition, 1917-19 by Benjamin Isitt, - Covers the CEF(S) in extreme detail. While Isitt isn't a military historian but a labour one his book is probably the single best in covering the topic and framing it in a domestic Canadian context.

    Red Army/ Soviet Army
    The Military Strategy of the Soviet Union: A History by David M. Glantz,

    “The Soviet German War 1941-1945: Myths and Realities: A Survey Essay” by David M. Glantz,

    Colossus Reborn: The Red Army At War, 1941-1943. by David M.Glantz,

    Belorussia 1944: The Soviet General Staff Study. by David M. Glantz,

    The Soviet Strategic Offensive in Marchuria, 1945: The August Storm. by David M. Glantz,

    When Titans Clashed: How the Red Army Stopped Hitler. by David M. Glantz,

    --I have an academic man-crush on Glantz, I'll admit. He's probably the leading English-Language expert on the Soviet Army. When Titans Clashed is an excellent overview of the Nazi-Soviet War. The Military Strategy Book is quite heavy but beyond the large section on the Nazi-Soviet War the sections on the Pre-War Red Army and the Post-War Soviet Army are good overviews of the issues, thoughts, and decisions made in those periods.

    “The Creation of Soviet Reserves and the Campaign of 1941” Military Affairs 50(1986) 21-28 by Louis Rotundo, - An article which covers the massive expansion of the Red Army in 1941, the sheer scale and difficulty of such a massive mustering.

    “Red Army Professionalism and the Communist Party,” The Journal of Military History 66 (2002): 71-102. by Roger R Reese, - Reese sheds light on the issues plaguing the Soviet officer corps even before Stalin's purges. Covers the political push against a professional officer corps and then the desperate attempt to foster one as the Red Army expanded to a massive size in 1938-41

    Second World War:

    Albert Speer and the Nazi Ministry of Arms: Economic Institutions and Industrial Production in the German War Economy. by E. R. Zilbert, - Great book on the Nazi War economy based on Speer's writings and comments itself.

    The Myth of the Eastern Front: The Nazi-Soviet War in American Popular Culture. by Edward J. Davies II and Ronald Smelser - Focuses on the white-washing of the Nazi-Soviet War, the Wehrmacht in particular, in American popular culture during the Cold War. Covers the rehabilitation of the Wehrmacht during the 1950-70s.

    The Blitzkrieg Legend: The 1940 Campaign in the West by Karl-Hienz Frieser, - A revisionist account of the German invasion of France.

    Why the Allies Won. by Richard Overy, - An overview of the variety of factors which led to Axis defeat in the Second World War. Chapters on the Nazi-Soviet War, Soviet and American War Economies, the Combined Bomber Offensive, Morale, and others.

    The Italian Navy in World War II by James J. Sadkovich, - Great book which seeks to rehabilitate the Regina Marina. Shows that the Italian Navy displayed a much stronger competence throughout the 1940-43 than is commonly portrayed.

    1939 Triple Alliance Negotiations/ Munich Crisis:

    “Molotov's Apprenticeship in Foreign Policy: The Triple Alliance Negotiation in 1939,” Europe-Asia Studies 52(2000) 695-722 by Derek Watson,

    "The Alliance that Failed: Moscow and the Triple Alliance Negotiations, 1939" European History Quarterly 26 (1996) 383-414. by Roberts, Geoffrey.

    -- These two articles cover the failed Triple Alliance Negotiations in 1939. They cover the reasons for their failure, on both the Soviet side, the Anglo-French, and the Polish sides. Good reads if you're interested in that sort of thing.

    The Soviets, the Munich Crisis, and the Coming of World War II. by Hugh Ragsdale, - Covers the Soviet response to the Munich Crisis. The diplomatic responses, including their cajoling of transit rights through Romania. Also covers the military response and the planed Soviet defence of Czechoslovakia. Good counter-point to the standard Munich Narrative.


    Chechen Wars:

    The Russian Conquest of the Caucasus. by John Baddeley - Written in 1908 its almost a primary document. Useful for covering the Tsarist pacification campaigns against Shamil's forces in the North Caucasus in the 1800's. Also a serious lens into British thinking at the time.

    The North Caucasus Barrier: the Russian Advance Towards the Muslim World. by Marie Broxup, and Abdurakham Avtorkhanov [eds]. - Great series of articles covering the history of the North Caucasus from the Middle Ages through to the Soviet Collapse. In depth articles on Shamil's resistance and the Muslim opposition to the Soviets during the Russian Civil War and the Stalinist period.

    Negotiating Hostage Crises with New Terrorists. by Adam Dolnik, and Keith Fitzgerald. - Excellent book which covers the Moscow Theatre Crisis and the Beslan School Crisis in some depth. Includes narratives of the events and critiques of the Russian performance.

    Chechnya: Tombstone of Russian Power. by Anatol Lieven, - Great source on the evolution and conduct of the First Chechen War. Just remember the author was there and be prepared to take into account his biases.

    "Does Indiscriminate Violence Incite Insurgent Attacks?” Journal of Conflict Resolution 53 (2009) 331-362 by Jason Lyall, - An extremely interesting article which suggests that indiscriminate violence may suppress insurgent groups in some circumstances. The case study come from the Second Chechen War.

    Chechnya: From Nationalism to Jihad. by James Hughes, - An overview of the Chechen conflicts in the 1990s and 2000s. Covers the shift from a secular nationalist opposition to Russia to an extreme religious one.

    Schlieffen Plan:

    The Schlieffen Plan, Critique of a Myth. by Gerhard Ritter, - This book is excellent, though the English translation is a bit wonky at times. Covers the development of the Schlieffen Plan from its break with Molke the Elder's thinking through Schlieffen's obsession, and to Molke the Younger's execution. Ritter clearly lays out the various issues with the plan in a convincing manner. Highly recommended.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
  18. Cetashwayo

    Cetashwayo Lord of Ten Thousand Years Magistrate On Leave Commission Artist

    Location:
    Across the Horizon
    If you can reform the titles I'll gladly put these in there. Really good stuff. For Book recommendations, look at Squishy's post for a good format.
     
  19. LordSquishy

    LordSquishy Probably Not A Producer

    At least the two Global War Games things can be found online, if memory serves, and linked.
     
  20. MobiusOneDT

    MobiusOneDT Red Tail Leader

    Location:
    Columbus, Georgia
    For the Pacific Theater in World War II:

    John Lundstrom's The First Team Series. The first book details the saga of the US Navy VF squadrons from Pearl Harbor to Midway, the second deals with the USN VF squadrons during the Guadalcanal campaign (well from August to November, when the issue was still in doubt) with the Marine and USAAF squadrons getting ample exposure as well. Lundstrom makes great use of Japanese after-action reports and documents, as well as interviews with numerous participants from the battles. Lundstrom is easily one the best sources of information for the first year of the Pacific War.

    Shattered Sword: The Untold Story of the Battle of Midway. by Jon Parshall and Anthony Tully. Essentially a look at the battle of midway through the Japanese side of the battle, with particular focus on the planning of the battle and the view of the battle from the four ill-fated Japanese carriers. Probably the definitive book on the battle, at least for the Japanese side.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  21. neolives

    neolives Lt. CIC

    I've edited my post to fit with the style you're looking for Cetashwayo. I trimmed most of the bibliographical details from most sources, but left them in for journal articles to make them easier for people to find. I also added links where publicly available. Hope that's helpful.
     
  22. Whiskey Golf

    Whiskey Golf Being of Editing & Technical Assistance Councillor

    Location:
    Chained to my desk
    I'd suggest www.combinedfleet.com. It's a great site that does a lot of analysis on the Japanese side of WW2. It's basically the prototype for what would become Shattered Sword, and run by the same people.
     
    • Like Like x 1
  23. 100thlurker

    100thlurker atheshtarih and Enemy of the Lie Magistrate

    Location:
    SMS Odette II
    If I might offer a suggestion, perhaps we should seriously consider splitting paywalled sources and books off into their own thread, while having the current Reference Library focus on publicly available sources.
     
  24. stormbringer951

    stormbringer951 Slap Drone Moderator On Leave

    Lurker and Cetashwayo beat me to the punch with a lot of links :p.

    Online Sources

    Cartographical
    ORBIS - From their About page: "The Stanford Geospatial Network Model of the Roman World reconstructs the time cost and financial expense associated with a wide range of different types of travel in antiquity. The model is based on a simplified version of the giant network of cities, roads, rivers and sea lanes that framed movement across the Roman Empire. It broadly reflects conditions around 200 CE but also covers a few sites and roads created in late antiquity."

    History Animated - Excellent animated Maps of the American Civil War, Revolutionary War, and World War II in Europe and the Pacific.

    Historical
    Historian on the Edge - The blog of Guy Halsall. The majority of posts are essays about late antiquity and the early medieval period in Western europe.

    "Because We Were Japanese Soldiers": The Failure of Japanese Tactics at Changkufeng and Nomonhan and Lessons Left Unlearned by Ryan Schultz - A dissection of the Japanese mistakes in their short-lived conflict with the Red Army in 1938-1939.

    Rich Men’s Skins; A Social History of Armour and Cutting Edge Technology by K. J. Parker - Some informative short essays on armour and swords respectively where the author's knowledge of the production processes and design principles shine through.

    Decisive Battles by FDChief - A series of informative, well-researched and colourfully presented blog posts on historical battles, both the well-known and important and some more obscure ones which catch the author's fancy.

    Modern Military

    Tactics 101 - A series of articles by retired US Infantry Officers on the mechanics of planning operations, how to execute various types of operations and battlefield decision-making. Covers some of the not-so-glamorous aspects of military planning (e.g. how to write an Operations Order).

    Army Field Manuals - GlobalSecurity.org's collection of US Army Field Manuals.

    Foreign Military Studies Office - Provides a large collection of articles on many topics researched from unclassified sources. From their About page: " FMSO conducts unclassified research of foreign perspectives of defense and security issues that are understudied or unconsidered but that are important for understanding the environments in which the U.S. military operates."

    Combined Arms Research Library - Hundreds of books and articles from the US Military examining conflicts from the Revolutionary War to present day.

    US Army Center of Military History - Hundreds of books and articles from the US Military examining conflicts from the Revolutionary War up to present day. (NOTE: Not the same as the above)

    John Boyd Compendium - A collection of the notes and presentations of John Boyd, the inventor of the OODA loop, fighter pilot and strategist.

    CIA Books and Monographs - A collection of publications by the CIA. Covers the agency's POV of various historical events, some interesting analysis of their opposition and intelligence analysis theory.

    Scientific

    Terminal Ballistics - An excellent resource on the mechanics of terminal ballistics. Very, very detailed.

    More to come later.
     
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
    • Like Like x 2
  25. Superticus

    Superticus

    Location:
    Australia
    Last edited: Apr 22, 2014
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